THE PUGGLE
SHARING WITH OTHERS TO MAKE
FASTER PROGRESS FOR ALL
Out in the bush, you’ll have to go into the pouch of a mama echidna to pet her baby puggle. Our Puggle is easier to find, showing up every month to share what we’re learning about emerging issues in girls’ education. Other posts provide our analysis of recent research and events and feature stories from our grantees. Explore more below, including a link to our resource library.

The Puggle: October 2018 edition

Dana Schmidt | November 16, 2018

In October, Echidna Giving launched a new website! The Puggle lives on our Insights page. We also hope you’ll check out the library of resources we’ve compiled and read about our strategy. Got feedback? Get in touch!

In other news this month, the Obama Foundation launched the Global Girls Alliance, a network for grassroots leaders supporting adolescent girls’ education to connect with one another and crowdsource funding. Christina Kwauk at Brookings lauds it as a “A global moment for local champions of girls’ education.”

The Malala Fund published Full Force: why the world works better when girls go to school, making the case for the G20 to invest in guaranteeing 12 years of education for every woman and girl. It argues that one billion girls and young women in low- and middle-income countries are missing out on the skills they need for the future of work.

Although we agree with the call for 12 years of education for girls, we were excited to see the World Bank’sHuman Capital Index adjust years of schooling based on how much students are actually learning. The Index tracks how well countries are supporting their citizen’s education and health and how that impacts productivity. For education, the index tracks “learning-adjusted years of school,” which discounts years of schooling based on how much is actually learned. For example, in Tanzania students can expect to complete 7.8 years of school by age 18, but only 4.8 learning-adjusted years of school.

Another recent report from the World Bank, Facing Forward, documents how far most countries in Sub-Saharan Africa are from the 12-year guarantee that the Malala Fund is calling for given how few students survive even to grade 9.

It is exciting to see a new report dedicated to adolescent girls in India, published for the first time this month by the Naandi Foundation. The Teen Age Girls report (and accompanying series of articles, 1, 2, and 3) shares findings from speaking with adolescent girls age 13-19 years across the country about education, health, basic life skills, agency, empowerment, and aspirations. The most striking part of the report was seeing how teenage girls from across socioeconomic classes are at a disadvantage thanks to gender discrimination. For example, as many as 52% of teenage Indian girls are anemic, and the rates are quite high even in the highest wealth quintile (42%). As the graph below shows, girls across the country also feel at a disadvantage compared to boys when it comes to education opportunities.

For a great synthesis of the relationships between education and gender norms, check out a new ALIGN thematic guide on this topic. It shares evidence on how gender norms limit education achievement, how education changes norms and where it reinforces them and highlights examples and resources for gender norm change through education.

If you’re doing work to end the norm of child marriage or know great groups who are, please pass on the Girls First Fund call for applications.

  • Recent posts

    • OCTOBER

    • SEPTEMBER

      Three themes on girls' education from UNGA

    • AUGUST

      Before we get to our usual Puggle updates, we have

    Load Older Posts

    Older posts

    • JULY

      We’re at the peak of vacation season in the Northern

    • JUNE

      The G7 summit in Canada in early June catalyzed a $3

    • MAY

      This month we’re diving deep on a topic related to

    • APRIL

      April marked the first full month of a new season

    • MARCH

      In this update from March, we celebrate the march of progress

    • FEBRUARY

      This month brought encouraging news on aid to education.

    • JANUARY

      This month, champions spoke up for girls: Oprah made a rousing

    • DECEMBER

      This month we are keeping it short and sweet. In

    • NOVEMBER

      This month we are excited to share a piece we published

    • JANUARY

      The latest World Development Report focuses exclusively on education for the first

    • OCTOBER

      Echidna Giving team highlights emerging issues and findings related to

    • SEPTEMBER

      This month the World Bank released the World Development Report (WDR). For

    • AUGUST

      August offered plenty of great material, including a collection of essays from

    • JULY

      There is a notion that things slow down during the

    • JUNE

    • MAY

      In May, the Center For Universal Education (CUE) and the

    • APRIL

      In April, the World Bank and IMF Spring Meetings served

    • MARCH

      March 8th marked International Women’s Day. This month we were

    • FEBRUARY

      Even if every single girl completed at least 6 grades

    • JANUARY

      News in January seemed to be dominated by the new

    • JANUARY

      In 2016, the Echidna Giving team reviewed literature related to

    • DECEMBER

      Welcome to the end-of-year installment of The Puggle. In this

    • NOVEMBER

      In September, the Echidna Giving team joined the masses of

    • OCTOBER

      In case you missed it, on October 11 the world celebrated

    • SEPTEMBER

      It turns out September was a busy month for

    • AUGUST

      This August we couldn’t help but be inspired by the Olympics!

    • JULY

      Echidna Giving is delighted to launch our blog, a space

  • The Puggle: October 2018 edition

    Dana Schmidt | November 16, 2018

    In October, Echidna Giving launched a new website! The Puggle lives on our Insights page. We also hope you’ll check out the library of resources we’ve compiled and read about our strategy. Got feedback? Get in touch!

    In other news this month, the Obama Foundation launched the Global Girls Alliance, a network for grassroots leaders supporting adolescent girls’ education to connect with one another and crowdsource funding. Christina Kwauk at Brookings lauds it as a “A global moment for local champions of girls’ education.”

    The Malala Fund published Full Force: why the world works better when girls go to school, making the case for the G20 to invest in guaranteeing 12 years of education for every woman and girl. It argues that one billion girls and young women in low- and middle-income countries are missing out on the skills they need for the future of work.

    Although we agree with the call for 12 years of education for girls, we were excited to see the World Bank’sHuman Capital Index adjust years of schooling based on how much students are actually learning. The Index tracks how well countries are supporting their citizen’s education and health and how that impacts productivity. For education, the index tracks “learning-adjusted years of school,” which discounts years of schooling based on how much is actually learned. For example, in Tanzania students can expect to complete 7.8 years of school by age 18, but only 4.8 learning-adjusted years of school.

    Another recent report from the World Bank, Facing Forward, documents how far most countries in Sub-Saharan Africa are from the 12-year guarantee that the Malala Fund is calling for given how few students survive even to grade 9.

    It is exciting to see a new report dedicated to adolescent girls in India, published for the first time this month by the Naandi Foundation. The Teen Age Girls report (and accompanying series of articles, 1, 2, and 3) shares findings from speaking with adolescent girls age 13-19 years across the country about education, health, basic life skills, agency, empowerment, and aspirations. The most striking part of the report was seeing how teenage girls from across socioeconomic classes are at a disadvantage thanks to gender discrimination. For example, as many as 52% of teenage Indian girls are anemic, and the rates are quite high even in the highest wealth quintile (42%). As the graph below shows, girls across the country also feel at a disadvantage compared to boys when it comes to education opportunities.

    For a great synthesis of the relationships between education and gender norms, check out a new ALIGN thematic guide on this topic. It shares evidence on how gender norms limit education achievement, how education changes norms and where it reinforces them and highlights examples and resources for gender norm change through education.

    If you’re doing work to end the norm of child marriage or know great groups who are, please pass on the Girls First Fund call for applications.

  • Recent posts

    • OCTOBER

    • SEPTEMBER

      Three themes on girls' education from UNGA

    • AUGUST

      Before we get to our usual Puggle updates, we have

    Load Older Posts

    Older posts

    • JULY

      We’re at the peak of vacation season in the Northern

    • JUNE

      The G7 summit in Canada in early June catalyzed a $3

    • MAY

      This month we’re diving deep on a topic related to

    • APRIL

      April marked the first full month of a new season

    • MARCH

      In this update from March, we celebrate the march of progress

    • FEBRUARY

      This month brought encouraging news on aid to education.

    • JANUARY

      This month, champions spoke up for girls: Oprah made a rousing

    • DECEMBER

      This month we are keeping it short and sweet. In

    • NOVEMBER

      This month we are excited to share a piece we published

    • JANUARY

      The latest World Development Report focuses exclusively on education for the first

    • OCTOBER

      Echidna Giving team highlights emerging issues and findings related to

    • SEPTEMBER

      This month the World Bank released the World Development Report (WDR). For

    • AUGUST

      August offered plenty of great material, including a collection of essays from

    • JULY

      There is a notion that things slow down during the

    • JUNE

    • MAY

      In May, the Center For Universal Education (CUE) and the

    • APRIL

      In April, the World Bank and IMF Spring Meetings served

    • MARCH

      March 8th marked International Women’s Day. This month we were

    • FEBRUARY

      Even if every single girl completed at least 6 grades

    • JANUARY

      News in January seemed to be dominated by the new

    • JANUARY

      In 2016, the Echidna Giving team reviewed literature related to

    • DECEMBER

      Welcome to the end-of-year installment of The Puggle. In this

    • NOVEMBER

      In September, the Echidna Giving team joined the masses of

    • OCTOBER

      In case you missed it, on October 11 the world celebrated

    • SEPTEMBER

      It turns out September was a busy month for

    • AUGUST

      This August we couldn’t help but be inspired by the Olympics!

    • JULY

      Echidna Giving is delighted to launch our blog, a space

  • We believe in exchanging ideas and sharing knowledge. Here’s some of what we’ve been reading to inform our thinking on girls’ education. Feel free to suggest additional resources for us to read and feature!